BOATING TIP FOR THE MONTH

Keeping the Electrolysis Demons at bay from your Honda Outboard Engine
If you’re using your Honda outboard in salt water, you need to understand the potentially damaging effects of ‘Electrolysis’. This process also referred to as ‘galvanic corrosion’ is caused when different metals are placed in a highly conductive liquid such as salt water, and the equivalent of a battery effect is established. Current will leak and flow when the metals are put in the salt water and because these metals possess different levels of conductivity, the current tries to make them all equal, removing in the process metal particles from one or other whichever is inferior.

To overcome this, all Honda outboards are fitted with a number of strategically placed ‘Sacrificial Anodes’ on both the exterior and interior of the engine casing as well as on the base of the actual transom mount. These Anodes are made from zinc because they have a higher voltage in the water than other metals, so as a result any leaking current will be directed to them as opposed to parts of your Honda outboard engine.

There are 'Sacrificial Anodes on either side of the gear casing

After a certain amount of usage, you’ll notice that these Anodes will slowly start to be eaten away which is a good thing because it means that they’re doing exactly what they’re meant to be doing. It’s therefore extremely important to monitor the wear on your Anodes on a regular basis and to replace them as and when required, ensuring the longevity of your Honda outboard by keeping these electrolysis demons at bay.

There's also an Anode at the base of the actual transom mount

Apart from your Anodes, other protective measures should also be followed, namely that you:

  • Make sure that your Honda outboard is tilted fully up out of the water when your boat stands on a mooring.
  • Repair any scratches or blemishes on your Honda outboard’s exterior finish as soon as you can.
  • Keep your boat’s wiring system dry and tightly connected at all times, particularly the battery connections, and preferably spray them and the interior of the engine down with anti-moisture repellant oil spray.

If you have any queries please consult you local Honda Marine Dealer for both information and advice.

HONDA RACING NEWS

World Superbike and World Supersport 2012
Round 01: Phillip Island Circuit – Australia – February 26, 2012

Honda World Superbike Team harvests points in Australia

Jonathan Rea

Jonathan Rea (Honda World Superbike Team) was only 0.134 seconds from third place in the second 22-lap race at Phillip Island, having held a top three finishing spot for virtually all the second leg around the 4.445Km circuit. After a seventh spot in race one, Rea sits fifth in the championship rankings, on 22 points, after opening day races that were won by Max Biaggi (Aprilia) and Carlos Checa (Ducati).

Jonathan Rea at Phillip Island

The rider from Northern Ireland had qualified in eighth place and after the disappointment of race one he was in determined mood in race two. His tyre had finally given its best, however, and despite some great tactical riding to keep eventual third place rider Tom Sykes behind him, Sykes had better drive out of the final corner and passed him down the long finish straight.

New SBK rider Hiroshi Aoyama (Honda World Superbike Team) rode with intelligence to record eighth in race one and ninth in race two, results that place him ninth in the championship overall, ahead of many more experienced riders in this class.

Hiroshi Aoyama at Phillip Island

Hiroshi was 17th in combined qualifying, which determined the grid positions after Superpole was cancelled. This was due to a fatal accident suffered by local rider Oscar McIntyre in a support class race earlier in the day, and Honda extends its deepest sympathises and condolences to Oscar’s family and friends.

New regulations, which specify that each rider only have one bike in the pit box in 2012, had an effect in qualifying for both Rea and Aoyama, each of whom lost some valuable time in this year’s 45-minute sessions. Rea missed some action after a sensor malfunctioned inside his engine and Aoyama had to have crash damage repaired.

Raffaele De Rosa (Pro Ride Motorsports Honda) did not start in race one despite making it to the start-line, and he was 17th from seventeen finishers in race two in his first race in this division, missing out on scoring points.

Honda Rider Comments:
Jonathan Rea – 7th and 4th.

We’ve still got a bagful of points to go on to Imola with but we wanted to be on the podium in both races. I honestly feel like we got a bad tyre in race one and in race two we didn’t want to run in the same situation, so we were thinking about changing the tyre, but all our logic and race runs throughout the weekend told us to keep this [harder] tyre in the heat. Directly, I had more grip – OK, the temperature was even hotter, which would go against our logic – but the tyre felt like it should feel and I was able to ride strong and consistent until probably five laps to go when durability fell off and I was going backwards. I felt fresh and strong in both races and the guys have worked well all weekend. We had a little crash on Saturday and the boys worked so good with the one-bike rule to get us back out there. You have to think that this circuit is a bit unique with the tyre character, how long you’re on the side and the heat generated in the tyre. Now we move on to some tracks that are good for us and there’s a lot of work to do back at base. The guys need to find some speed, so that’s on the agenda; I’ve just done a de-brief and everything feels OK. I want to say thanks to everyone for all their help this weekend – it feels good to get to the start of the season fit and healthy and I’m looking forward to round two now. 
 

Hiroshi Aoyama – 8th and 9th 
I think it’s not so bad for my first Superbike weekend. We had a not-so-easy start on Friday when I had one crash and we had a lot of problems. That didn’t help us to go much faster and we tried many things but couldn’t improve. In the races we managed to finish in the top ten with eighth and ninth and I want to say thanks to all the guys who worked for me. It was a tough weekend but ended up not too bad. I’m looking forward to the next race in Imola – of course I’ve never ridden there, so it’s going to be tough for Friday. We have month to improve the bike a little bit and, if I can find a better feeling, I can push a little bit more and this is what I am looking for. Anyway, considering the situation now, it’s not so bad!

 

Parkes Climbs The Podium After Short but Epic Supersport Race

Broc Parkes on the Podium

Pole position man Broc Parkes Broc Parkes (Ten Kate Racing Products Honda) made a less than perfect start in the FIM Supersport World Championship race and was down in fifth for some time, then dropped to sixth, before fighting back to score third place at his home race, all despite ever-worsening rear tyre grip.

Due to fears about tyre life in the hot track conditions at Phillip Island the opening round was shortened to 15-laps instead of the scheduled 21. Most riders still had traction issues on race-day, despite track temperatures of 43°C, far less than the near 60°C temperatures which were evident during final qualifying on Saturday. Parkes was also fastest man in warm-up this morning, despite only doing three laps right at the end of the 20-minute session.

Former Moto2 rider, but WSS rookie Jules Cluzel (PTR Honda) followed up on a third place grid position with fourth in the race, just over two seconds from winner Kenan Sofuoglu (Kawasaki) and second place rider Fabien Foret (Kawasaki). Cluzel also found issues with rear tyre grip near the end and could not hold onto the more experienced Parkes.

Sam Lowes (Bogdanka PTR Honda) opted to bring his bike home safely in fifth place, just less than five seconds from the winner, as he has a blistered rear tyre. His mature approach earned him eleven championship points. He had started from second spot on the grid, the middle rider in a qualifying 1-2-3 run for Honda.

Ronan Quarmby (PTR Honda) went from 13th on the grid to an assured seventh in the race, ending up riding alone and to save his rear tyre. Lukas Pesek (PRORACE Honda) secured a top ten on the opening day of WSS play, stepping up two places from his qualifying position.

South African Mathew Scholtz (Bogdanka PTR Honda) was the last Honda rider in the points, 14th, and one of many new riders to the class this season. He had qualified 15th.

Balazs Nemeth (Racing Team Toth Honda) was on course for a top ten until he slipped back severely to record a 20th place finish.

Andrea Antonelli (Team Lorini Honda), Martin Jessopp (Riders PTR Honda) and Imre Toth (Racing Team Toth Honda) finished 16th, 17th and 18th respectively.

Pawel Szkopek (Bogdanka Racing Honda) and Ondrej Jezek (SMS Racing Honda) each failed to finish, as did ninth place qualifier Roberto Tamburini (Team Lorini Honda). Thomas Caiani (KUJA Racing Honda) was the last rider classified as a finisher, in 23rd place after experiencing some issues in practice.

HONDA RIDER COMMENTS:  
Broc Parkes (Ten Kate Racing Products Honda) 
- 3rd.

“I did not get a good start, but I was not too concerned about it. I did not attack well enough in the first six or seven laps. So I left my charge a bit too late. I was really concerned about my rear tyre, maybe a little bit too much. It was still torn quite a bit at the end. I just could not do any more and had to take the points today. I lost a gap early on and tried to close the gap at the end, but my grip was going quite quick at the end. A top three in the first race is quite good all the same.”

RACE RESULTS:
World Superbike and World Supersport 2012


Round 01: Phillip Island Circuit – Australia

Superbike Race 1

Rank Rider (Team)

1

M. BIAGGI (Aprilia Racing Team)

2

M. MELANDRI (BMW Motorrad Motorsport)

3

S. GUINTOLI (Team Effenbert Liberty Racing)

4

T. SYKES (Kawasaki Racing Team)

5

J. SMRZ (Liberty Racing Team Effenbert)

6

M. FABRIZIO (BMW Motorrad Italia GoldBet)

7

J. REA (Honda World Superbike Team)

8

H. AOYAMA (Honda World Superbike Team)

9

D. GIUGLIANO (Althea Racing)

10

B. STARING (Team Pedercini)

11

L. ZANETTI (PATA Racing Team)

12

L. HASLAM (BMW Motorrad Motorsport)

13

M. BERGER (Team Effenbert Liberty Racing)

14

D. SALOM (Team Pedercini)

15

J. LASCORZ (Kawasaki Racing Team)

 

Superbike Race 2

Rank Rider (Team)

1

C. CHECA (Althea Racing)

2

M. BIAGGI (Aprilia Racing Team)

3

T. SYKES (Kawasaki Racing Team)

4

J. REA (Honda World Superbike Team)

5

L. HASLAM (BMW Motorrad Motorsport)

6

M. MELANDRI (BMW Motorrad Motorsport)

7

M. BERGER (Team Effenbert Liberty Racing)

8

E. LAVERTY (Aprilia Racing Team)

9

H. AOYAMA (Honda World Superbike Team)

10

N. CANEPA (Red Devils Roma)

11

J. SMRZ (Liberty Racing Team Effenbert)

12

L. CAMIER (Crescent Fixi Suzuki)

13

D. GIUGLIANO (Althea Racing)

14

L. ZANETTI (PATA Racing Team)

15

J. BROOKES (Crescent Fixi Suzuki)

 

Supersport

Rank Rider (Team)

1

K. SOFUOGLU (Kawasaki DeltaFin Lorenzini)

2

F. FORET (Kawasaki Intermoto Step)

3

B. PARKES (Ten Kate Racing Products)

4

J. CLUZEL (PTR Honda)

5

S. LOWES (Bogdanka PTR Honda)

6

S. MORAIS (Kawasaki DeltaFin Lorenzini)

7

R. QUARMBY (PTR Honda)

8

A. BALDOLINI (Power Team by Suriano)

9

V. IANNUZZO (Power Team by Suriano)

10

L. PESEK (PRORACE)

11

J. METCHER (Rivamoto Junior Team)

12

J. DAY (Team GOELEVEN)

13

L. MARCONI (VFT Racing)

14

M. SCHOLTZ (Bogdanka PTR Honda)

15

F. MENGHI (VFT Racing)

 

 

Honda Indy V8 Honoured by Race Engine Magazine
Race Engine Technology magazine, a respected British technical publication, has named the Honda Indy V8 engine as its “North American Race Engine of the Year” for 2011. In its latest issue, the Honda Indy V8 engine was recognized by Race Engine Technology for its combination of reliability, performance and equality during its just-concluded six-year run as the engine supplied to every team taking part in the IZOD IndyCar Series.

Honda took on the role of single engine supplier to IndyCar racing in 2006, after scoring back-to-back Manufacturers’ Championships the previous two seasons. Throughout six years as single engine supplier, 98 different drivers completed more than one million miles (1,188,366) of practice, qualifying and racing, with only six in-race engine failures. No in-race failures were reported during the entire 2008, 2010 and 2011 race seasons.

In 2011 alone, 41 drivers completed 206,113 miles of IZOD IndyCar Series competition without a single race-day failure.
From 2006-2011, Honda also powered the entire 33-car Indianapolis 500 starting field. For a record-setting six consecutive seasons – and the only six times in Indy history – there were no engine-related retirements during the running of the Memorial Day classic.

“The Honda Indy V8 engine had quite a run, and we are honored to be recognized for its accomplishments by Race Engine Technology,” said Roger Griffiths, technical director of Honda Performance Development, the racing arm of American Honda Motor Co., Inc. “In addition to its well-deserved reputation for reliability, we take pride in the effort made by our associates at HPD, and our technical partners at Ilmor Engineering, to ensure equality and reliability to all teams and drivers throughout our time as engine supplier to the IndyCar Series, during which performance levels of all the engines varied by less than one per cent.”

In 2012, manufacturer competition returns to the IZOD IndyCar Series with both Chevrolet and Lotus joining Honda. All three companies have produced new, turbocharged V6 engines to new series specifications. Honda’s new engine, the HI12R, will make its competition debut March 25 at the season-opening Honda Grand Prix of St. Petersburg in Florida.

Features of the new design include a combined direct/indirect fuel injection system, single Borg-Warner turbocharger, “drive-by-wire” throttle technology and a series-spec McLaren Electronics Engine Control Unit (ECU).
Established in 2003 and published eight times a year, Race Engine Technology is a professional review and technical journal, covering contemporary racing power-train developments and technologies. Under the direction of publisher Simon Moss, the magazine is read by professional power-train designers, engineers and industry professionals throughout the global racing community.

Founded in 1993, Honda Performance Development (HPD) is the Honda racing company within North America. HPD is the technical operations center for high-performance Honda racing cars and engines and operates at race circuits around the world from its headquarters in Santa Clarita, California.

Honda has been a fixture in North American open-wheel racing since 1994, and has played an active role in the growth of the IZOD IndyCar Series – as both a Manufacturers’ Championship competitor and single engine supplier – since joining the series in 2003.
The company scored its first Indianapolis 500 victory in 2004 with Buddy Rice; Manufacturers’ Championships in 2004 and ’05; and became engine supplier to the entire IZOD IndyCar Series in 2006. The 2010 Indianapolis 500, won by Dario Franchitti, marked Honda’s 100th race win as a manufacturer and engine supplier in IZOD IndyCar Series competition.

In addition to its efforts in Indy car racing, HPD spearheaded championship-winning efforts in the 2009-2010 American Le Mans Series, 2010 Le Mans Series and the 2010 24 Hours of Le Mans.

HPD offers a line of race engines for track applications from prototype sports cars to karting; for professional, amateur and entry-level efforts.

BOAT REVIEW

This month Leisure Boating, SA’s premier monthly boating magazine, compares the Panache 1450 with the Odyssey 1450, both boats being powered by Honda BF60HP outboard engines. To read the review click on the link below and look under Latest Boat Reviews:    http://www.leisureboating.co.za

 

WWF HONDA MARINE PARKS PROGRAMME

False Bay Coastal Conservation Partnership Update
The precarious state of our oceans and ways in which to manage it sustainably is set to come under the spotlight in a series of regional workshops. Over the next few weeks special attention will be given to False Bay, lying adjacent to the city of Cape Town and the iconic Table Mountain. The Bay is an iconic landscape in its own right and needs improved management with a focus on its socio-economic needs and environmental realities. A range of subjects including fishing and harvesting of marine life, tourism, the coastal economy, as well as marine policies and direct and indirect coastal user conflict are some of the topics that will be discussed.

Great White Shark

WWF-SA – through the Honda Marine Parks Programme – and the City of Cape Town have partnered to support the False Bay Coastal Conservation Partnership, with the following objectives:

  • Create a platform (the False Bay Forum) for stakeholders (civil society) to engage meaningfully with all governance institutions and have input into coastal management issues;
  • Improve the well-being of the marine socio-ecological system;
  • Support and strengthen local organisations and initiatives;
  • Improve collective management efforts;
  • Develop a shared vision for False Bay and use this to unite partners from several industries and interest groups; and
  • Develop an Integrated Coastal and Marine False Bay Management Plan.

Simonstown Coastal Development

To begin this process, a public workshop was held in Simonstown in mid-February, with the aim of engaging the various stakeholder groups and to begin to find common ground and understanding amongst all the stakeholders. With a diverse range of interests represented at the workshop, and with the fairly challenging task of coming up with a shared vision for False Bay, identification of the priority tasks is needed to get from the current state of management to the future vision for the Bay; it was a jam-packed, interactive, and demanding day.
The results were hugely encouraging! The positive, co-operative attitudes of the workshop participants; the strong commonality that emerged; the overlap of the issues, concerns and priorities; and the shared vision that emerged; all indicated that this process could genuinely represent the people of False Bay and their needs, and could positively contribute towards the improved, integrated management of False Bay.

Dead Jackopever with plastic in the water

Following this public workshop, a series of focussed, single stakeholder workshops will now be held to facilitate further input from the users of False Bay. Through this process it is hoped that the issues identified in the first workshop will be further detailed, unpacked, and prioritized by each user group, making sure that every stakeholder has a real chance to add their voice to the process.

This is a very new, dynamic space, and WWF-SA is excited to be able to be part of enabling the process of stakeholder participation and integrated coastal management in South Africa.

All Photos courtesy of Peter Chadwick – Manager: WWF Honda Marine Parks Programme

PRODUCT NEWS

Honda Marine Announces Plan to Launch All-New Electric Shift Throttle System

New Technology for New and Existing Honda Marine Outboards
Honda Marine introduced at the Miami Boat Show a plan to introduce a Honda branded electronic shift and throttle system for its popular V6 outboard engines. The new Honda in-cowl system will provide shift and throttle actuation within the current outboard cowling envelope for ease of use and an integrated design.

Featuring a stylized control handle and tailored to Honda’s exacting performance requirements, the shift and throttle system will be able to be installed on new and previously purchased BF200, BF225 and BF250 Honda outboard engines, creating a smooth incorporation into multiple products and boating platforms. Both single- and multi-engine applications can seamlessly accommodate the system without the need for additional installation kits or components.

“The new Honda electric shift and throttle system further enhances our commitment to creating engine products that provide the highest levels of customer satisfaction,” said Alan Simmons, national manager, Honda Marine . “The introduction of this system allows our customers to enjoy an even better and more rewarding experience while using their Honda outboards.”

Single engine systems will include features for improved throttle control while docking, fine-tuning of trolling speed and multi-station applications. Multi-engine systems will include engine synchronization, single lever control for all engines utilizing the system, single bottom trim of all engines and individual trim controls for twin engine set-ups. The system will also feature onboard diagnostics for easy setup.”

A compact control processor includes one processor per engine for system integrity and tachometer inputs for multi-engine synchronization. The shift actuator is shift mounted in the upper rigging cover with a three-position, high shift load capacity. For ease of installation, a two-piece rigging cover has been utilized.

Beginning in late summer / early fall of 2012, the new Honda electric shift throttle system will be available for installation at Honda Marine dealers and participating boat builders nationwide.

All new Honda outboard engines sold for recreational use offer an industry-best True 5-year, non-declining limited factory warranty that is the same on the last day as it is on the first.

Honda Marine exclusively features four-stroke outboard engine technology for high fuel efficiency, quiet operation, and low emissions. Honda’s outboards share the same unparalleled durability, quality, and reliability of its legendary automobiles. With models ranging from 2 to 250 horsepower, the Honda Marine full line of current production models certify to California Air Resources Board (CARB) 3-Star standards, ensuring their availability and regulatory compliance in all 50 states.

 

 

Honda BF250 Features and Specifications
The Honda BF250 four-stroke engine is the newest and most powerful outboard to join the Honda Marine lineup – and now the company’s flagship model. The design of the BF250 incorporates a number of advanced technological innovations that contribute to the engine’s high fuel economy and superior performance.

The 3.6 litre VTEC® (Variable Valve Timing and Lift Electronic Control®) engine is equipped with an all-new gear case, incorporates the world’s first marine direct air induction system of its type on a production outboard (providing for cooler, denser air for better combustion than conventional under-cowl induction systems), and has a full-throttle RPM range of 5300-6300.

The Honda BF250 engine also incorporates the Boosted Low Speed Torque (BLAST™) System through which holeshot and acceleration are dramatically improved by advancing ignition spark timing to within one degree of the knock limit during ‘hammer down’ acceleration.

Engine:
Type Four-Stroke 60° V-6
Displacement 3583 cc (219 cubic in)
Bore & Stroke 89 mm x 96 mm (3.50 in. x 3.77 in)
Full Throttle HP Range 5300 – 6300 RPM
HP Rating at Propshaft 250 hp @ 5800 rpm
Induction Scavenging SOHC VTEC®
Valves Per Cylinder 4
Fuel Delivery Programmed Fuel Injection
Fuel 86 Octane
Ignition System Microcomputer Programmed
Starting System Electric
Lubrication Wet Sump
Cooling System Water Cooled
Alternator 90 Total Amps (60 Charging Amps)AMP+: 9 additional amps at idle
Trim Range -4° to +16°
Tilt Range 72°
Drive:
Gear Ratio 2:00:1 (24/12)
Gear Shift F-N-R
Propeller Optional (up to 16” diameter)
Dimensions:
Overall Length 920 mm / 36.22 in
Overall Width 625 mm / 24.60 in
Recommended Transom Height(s) (L) 508 mm / 20.0 in
(X) 635 mm / 25.0 in
(XX) 762 mm/ 30.0 in
Dry Weight (L) 278 kg / 611 lbs

(X) 284 kg / 624 lbs

 

 

All Honda outboards are now NMEA 2000 compliant from BF40 right up to BF250 (excluding BF75 and BF90 – compliancy available shortly)

NMEA 2000 is the onboard (Marine) communication standard of boats and vessels. It’s based upon a CAN (Controller Area Network) which was originally designed for use in automotive applications but has been expanded into other areas such as Marine.

It has been designed to permit a number of devices to communicate with each other and utilise common connectivity standards. To maximize upon the potential of the NMEA 2000 network, Garmin recently introduced the Garmin GMI 10 which will offer you a fully integrated marine instrument system.

The overall Package Includes:

GMI 10 
Mounting hardware
Protective cover
Power/NMEA 0183 cable
NMEA 2000 power cable
NMEA 2000 drop cable
NMEA 2000 tee & terminator kit
Installation instructions
Quick start manual

Certainly the GMI 10 Digital Marine Instrument display adds a new dimension of flexibility for boaters who want a fully integrated marine instrument system.

Simplified Marine Instrumentation
The GMI 10 improves upon the traditional method of marine instrumentation, in which standard marine instruments have their own dedicated display. By displaying data from multiple remote sensors on one screen, the GMI 10 offers a streamlined approach to marine instrumentation.

Mariners can use the GMI 10 to display instrument data such as depth, speed through the water, water temperature, fuel flow rate, engine data, fuel level, wind direction and more, depending upon what sensors are connected. In fact, the GMI 10 supports more than two dozen standard NMEA 2000 and more than 20 NMEA 0183 data sentences.
Connects with the Garmin Family of Marine Sensors
Featuring a bright, 3.5” QVGA screen in a sleek 4-inch flush-mount bezel, the GMI 10 serves as the hub of a family of integrated Garmin marine sensors, all connected via NMEA 2000 or NMEA 0183 data ports.

The GMI 10 marine instrument family consists of the GFS 10 fuel sensor, NMEA 2000 and NMEA 0183 Intelliducers and the GPS 17x high sensitivity receiver/antenna.

GMI 10 Features:
Unit dimensions, WxHxD: 4.3 ” x 4.4 ” x 1.9 ” (10.9 x 11.1 x 4.8 cm)
Display resolution, WxH: 320 x 240 pixels
Display type: Color QVGA display
NMEA ports: NMEA 0183, NMEA 2000
Waterproof: yes (IPX7)
Audible alarms: yes
Flush mountable: yes
Auto-on: yes

With integration via NMEA 2000 ports, any of these units can be added or removed from the NMEA 2000 bus without affecting other units on the bus. For easy installation, the latest version of the GMI 10 is powered exclusively through the NMEA 2000 network. While the GMI 10 supports NMEA 0183 Transmit and Receive, installs now will require an NMEA 2000 connection for power. As a result, the GMI 10 also is not backwards compatible to existing power cable connections. These units also can connect to any Garmin Marine Network chartplotters that have a NMEA 2000 port.
The GMI 10 is recommended by Honda for use with all Honda NMEA 2000 engines – BF40 right up to BF250 (excluding BF75 and BF90, compliancy available shortly). Also, it is the first display capable of showing Honda Marine’s Lean Burn technology, “ECOmo” (single or multiple engine configurations), the benefits of which include overall fuel savings and lower operating costs.
Please contact your local Honda Marine dealer for additional details and engine compatibility information.