HONDA RACING NEWS

MotoGP World Championship Grand Prix – Round 16: Malaysia October 21 2012

Pedrosa Wins in Tropical Downpour, Stoner Takes Third

Dani Pedrosa wins in Malaysia

Dani Pedrosa (Repsol Honda RC213V) won a shortened Malaysian Grand Prix in thunderous, rain-lashed conditions at Sepang. The result was his third consecutive victory and reduces the advantage of World Championship leader Jorge Lorenzo (Yamaha) to 23 points with two races remaining. Team-mate Casey Stoner (Repsol Honda RC213V) finished third in his second race since returning from injury.

Pedrosa’s win gave the Spaniard his first premier-class hat-trick and continues a remarkable run of form that has seen him win four of the last five rounds aboard his Honda RC213V. It was also his sixth success of the year and his first victory in the rain.

Dani Pedrosa

The race got underway on a wet track, with steady raining falling, following earlier downpours that had seen the Moto2 race delayed due to a flooded track. About halfway through the 20-lap MotoGP race the rain intensified, triggering a rash of crashes, including Stefan Bradl (LCR Honda MotoGP RC213V) who had been going well in sixth place.

Bradl, like all the other fallers, was not hurt, but by now conditions were rapidly worsening and there was standing water in several areas. Halfway through lap 14 the Race Director stopped the race, counting the results from lap 13. But because two-thirds race distance had not been completed, Race Direction considered a restart, until it was decided that conditions were too dangerous.

Pedrosa started well from second on the grid, while Lorenzo charged into the lead. Within a couple of laps Pedrosa was on the back wheel of his compatriot and getting into his rhythm. At half-distance he out-braked Lorenzo into the final turn and quickly built a gap, then controlled his RCV brilliantly as the conditions became increasingly treacherous. Four laps later the race was red-flagged. By then six of the 20 starters had crashed out.

Stoner only came back from injury at Motegi last weekend, so the Australian was delighted to score his first podium since he won July’s US GP. With his right ankle still healing, he had considered not racing because it’s so easy to fall in the rain and because he didn’t want to risk putting himself out for the rest of his final season.

During the early laps Stoner was at the head of the pack fighting over third, then he steadily established himself in that position before starting to close on Lorenzo when the rain got heavier. Had the race gone full distance he was sure he could have passed Lorenzo and challenged for the win.

Casey Stoner

The Repsol Honda Team riders’ double podium secured the MotoGP team championship for the second consecutive year. Honda still have the chance to add the constructors’ and riders’ titles in the final two races of the year.

Bradl was running strongly in sixth, just behind Alvaro Bautista (San Carlo Honda Gresini RC213V) and just ahead of Valentino Rossi (Ducati) when he ran into engine-braking issues. The rookie adjusted the engine-braking map on his RCV but continued to struggle, then fell at the extra-slippery turn seven which had already claimed three other riders.

Like most riders, Bautista believes that Race Direction made the right call to stop the race when they did, because the track was “like a river”. The Spaniard rode well in spite of some issues on the bumps while braking.

Alvaro Bautista

Moto2
Alex De Angelis (NGM Mobile Forward Racing – FTR) won the shortened Moto2 race, also run in challenging, ever-changing conditions. The Honda-powered event started late after a torrential downpour that hit the track after the opening Moto3 event. During the early stages of the Moto2 race the track was soaking in some parts, almost dry in others, but the heavens opened once again during the closing stages, forcing the Race Director to bring out the red flags.

The race was a thriller, with de Angelis fighting for much of the 15 laps with the local wild card and two riders who always shine in rainy conditions. Local hero Hafizh Syahrin (Petronas Raceline Malaysia – FTR) was the surprise of the race, while Anthony West (QMMF Racing Team – Speed Up) and Gino Rea (Federal Oil Gresini Moto2 – Suter) are well known for their wet-weather prowess.

Syahrin, who had qualified 27th in the dry, led for several laps. His riding brought the crowd to its feet but in the end he could not quite stay with the other three and had to be content with a close fourth-place finish. Nonetheless the result was an impressive achievement for the 18-year-old Malaysian who usually rides in the Spanish CEV Moto2 series. This was Syahrin’s second GP ride, following his World Championship debut in last year’s Malaysian Moto2 race.

De Angelis really got his head down when the rain came back in earnest, opening a two-second lead. But that was quickly swallowed up by Rea and West, Rea sliding into the lead at the end of lap 16. Moments later the red flags were displayed and the result was taken back a lap to lap 15, because some riders had not completed lap 16 when the red flags came out. That made de Angelis the winner, just ahead of West and Rea.

Julian Simon (Blusens Avintia – Suter) was fifth, a few seconds down on Syahrin after Thomas Luthi (Interwetten-Paddock-Suter) had slid off as the rain returned. The Swiss was one of many fallers, including World Championship leader Marc Marquez (Team CatalunyaCaixa Repsol-Suter) who was on course to secure the 2012 world title until he fell on lap 13. Marquez had been riding with Andrea Iannone (Speed Master – Speed Up), who slid off and remounted to finish sixth.

Mika Kallio (Marc VDS Racing Team – Kalex), Bradley Smith (Tech 3 Racing – Tech 3), Dominique Aegerter (Technomag-CIP Suter) and Esteve Rabat (Pons 40 HP Tuenti – Kalex) completed the top ten.

Marquez’s championship rival Pol Espargaro (Pons 40 HP Tuenti-Kalex) could only manage 11th at the finish, but that result was enough to keep his title hopes alive for another race.

Moto3
Sandro Cortese (KTM) secured the first-ever Moto3 World Championship with a thrilling last-corner victory over local hero Zulfahmi Khairuddin (KTM) in the day’s opening race.

Honda’s top finisher was Miguel Oliveira (Estrella Galicia 0.0 – Suter Honda) who spent much of the race – run in the dry but with a few spots of rain – involved in an entertaining battle with team-mate Alex Rins (Estrella Galicia 0.0 – Suter Honda) and KTM riders Luis Salom and Danny Kent. Oliveira crossed the line in fifth place, 0.171s behind Salom and just ahead of Kent. Rins dropped back from the group in the final laps to finish seventh.

Efren Vazquez (JHK T-Shirt Laglisse – FTR Honda) started superbly from the third row of the grid to hold third place at the end of the first lap. However, the Spaniard couldn’t maintain that front-running pace and slipped back to finish the race in a lonely eighth position.

Louis Rossi (Racing Team Germany – FTR Honda) had high hopes of a great race after qualifying just off the front row of the grid. The Frenchman started brilliantly, fighting for third place until he slid off on lap six.

Adrian Martin (JHK T-Shirt Laglisse – FTR Honda) completed the top ten, after a frantic skirmish with half a dozen rivals.

MotoGP World Championship Grand Prix
 – Round 16: Malaysia

MotoGP

Pedrosa and Stoner on the Podium

Rank Rider (Team)

1

Dani PEDROSA (Repsol Honda Team)

2

Jorge LORENZO (Yamaha Factory Racing)

3

Casey STONER (Repsol Honda Team)

4

Nicky HAYDEN (Ducati Team)

5

Valentino ROSSI (Ducati Team)

6

Alvaro BAUTISTA (San Carlo Honda Gresini)

7

Hector BARBERA (Pramac Racing Team)

8

Aleix ESPARGARO (Power Electronics Aspar)

9

James ELLISON (Paul Bird Motorsport)

10

Karel ABRAHAM (Cardion AB Motoracing)

11

Danilo PETRUCCI (Came IodaRacing Project)

12

Michele PIRRO (San Carlo Honda Gresini)

13

Andrea DOVIZIOSO (Monster Yamaha Tech 3)

Moto2

Rank Rider (Team)

1

Alex DE ANGELIS (NGM Mobile Forward Racing)

2

Anthony WEST (QMMF Racing Team)

3

Gino REA (Federal Oil Gresini Moto2)

4

Hafizh SYAHRIN (Petronas Raceline Malaysia)

5

Julian SIMON (Blusens Avintia)

6

Andrea IANNONE (Speed Master)

7

Mika KALLIO (Marc VDS Racing Team)

8

Bradley SMITH (Tech 3 Racing)

9

Dominique AEGERTER (Technomag-CIP)

10

Esteve RABAT (Tuenti Movil HP 40)

11

Pol ESPARGARO (Tuenti Movil HP 40)

12

Scott REDDING (Marc VDS Racing Team)

13

Toni ELIAS (Italtrans Racing Team)

14

Axel PONS (Tuenti Movil HP 40)

15

Ricard CARDUS (Arguinano Racing Team)

Moto3

Rank Rider (Team)

1

Sandro CORTESE (Red Bull KTM Ajo)

2

Zulfahmi KHAIRUDDIN (AirAsia-Sic-Ajo)

3

Jonas FOLGER (Mapfre Aspar Team Moto3)

4

Luis SALOM (RW Racing GP)

5

Miguel OLIVEIRA (Estrella Galicia 0,0)

6

Danny KENT (Red Bull KTM Ajo)

7

Alex RINS (Estrella Galicia 0,0)

8

Efren VAZQUEZ (JHK t-shirt Laglisse)

9

Niklas AJO (TT Motion Events Racing)

10

Adrian MARTIN (JHK t-shirt Laglisse)

11

Arthur SISSIS (Red Bull KTM Ajo)

12

Brad BINDER (RW Racing GP)

13

Jack MILLER (Caretta Technology)

14

Alex MARQUEZ (Ambrogio Next Racing)

15

Niccolo` ANTONELLI (San Carlo Gresini Moto3

 

 

WTCC World Touring Car Championship – Round 10: Japan – October 21 2012

Civic WTCC finishes Races 1 and 2 in 9th and 10th respectively in its first appearance

WTCC Honda Civic

Rounds 19 and 20 of the WTCC recently took place under a clear sky at Suzuka Circuit in Mie Prefecture, Japan.

Race 1:
Race 1 got underway at 2:30pm and was competed over 26 laps on the East Course of Suzuka Circuit. Tiago Monteiro started the race in his Honda Civic WTCC from 11th. After a rolling start, Tiago kept his position at the beginning of the race. Throughout there were close fights with the cars in front and behind, but the Civic WTCC driver maintained his place and when a front-runner went off the track on Lap 22, he climbed to tenth – the position he kept until he was shown the checkered flag. After the finish of the race, the Civic WTCC was promoted to ninth in the final classification due to a penalty given to another car.
Race 2:
In Race 2, the first 10 cars in qualifying were placed in reverse order on the starting grid. After a standing start from 11th, Tiago maintained his position at the early stage of the race and later started fighting closely with a BMW in front. After a long battle over 10 laps, he finally overtook his rival on the first corner on Lap 23 to move up to 10th before finishing the 26-lap race.

Rounds 21 and 22 of the WTCC in China will be held on Shanghai International Circuit on 3 and 4 November.
Driver Tiago Monteiro:
“We are very happy and excited that we got our first points. Only a few weeks ago, we said we it would be great if we could break into the top 10, and that’s where we are, so I’m satisfied. The car felt quite good, a lot better than in qualifying. But we are still learning about the car, and every time we try to find a better setup and balance in the car, so especially in Race 2, the car was very good. It was very important for us to finish the races in decent conditions as a first step and we will keep working hard in Shanghai and Macao to lean more.”

Honda Racing Team JAS Team Principal, Alessandro Mariani:
“I am very pleased because we were able to show our speed in the actual races. Our lap times were very good and consistent. Unfortunately, it was difficult to overtake on the short Suzuka circuit and the result of yesterday’s qualifying affected our final outcome. However, finishing in the top ten in the two races – and not that far from the winning cars – is a good result. I would like to thank the engineers at Honda who created the excellent new engine and our team members who have worked hard, night and day, to achieve this result – a great effort that has really paid off.”

Mariani with Monteiro

Chief Engineer for Civic WTCC Development, Daisuke Horiuchi:
“I am pleased that we completed both Races 1 and 2 in our debut round. The car, including the engine, performed well and didn’t have any major problems. However, there’s so much more for us to work on and improve. Although we’ve not had long to prepare, we were able to make it in time for Suzuka. So, I think we have achieved a satisfactory level for now. We will continue working hard to complete the car for the next rounds in China, and we really appreciate everyone’s support.”
WTCC World Touring Car Championship
Round 10: Japan

Race 1

Rank Drivers (Team)

1

Alain Menu (Chevrolet Cruze)

2

Yvan Muller (Chevrolet Cruze)

3

Robert Huff (Chevrolet Cruze)

4

Gabriele Tarquini (SEAT Leon)

5

Alex MacDowall (Chevrolet Cruze)

6

Tom Coronel (BMW 320)

9

Tiago Monteiro (Honda Civic WTCC)

Race 2

Rank Drivers (Team)

1

Stefano D’aste (BMW320)

2

Pepe Oriola (SEAT Leon)

3

Gabriele Tarquini (SEAT Leon)

4

Robert Huff (Chevrolet Cruze)

5

Alain Menu (Chevrolet Cruze)

6

Yvan Muller (Chevrolet Cruze)

10

Tiago Monteiro (Honda Civic WTCC)

 

 

 

The Dakar Rally – Morocco Rally –October 20 2012

TEAM HRC leaves Morocco satisfied, Rodrigues wins the final stage

Team HRC

Helder Rodrigues won the 6th and last stage of the Morocco Rally ahead of Pedrero and Despres, who claimed the victory of the Morocco Rally 2012. Despite the technical problem in Special Stage 4 (SS4) that pushed Rodrigues out of the race when he was leading the overall standing and was fighting for the victory within Honda’s reach, TEAM HRC leaves Morocco satisfied with the good work done by all five riders and the performance of the CRF 450 rally.

The first Honda rider, behind Rodrigues, was the 23 year old Sam Sunderland, who finished 4th in SS6 and sits 10th overall. The Brit experienced some ups and downs during the race, but Sam leaves satisfied with very positive feelings about the machine and the teamwork.

Sam Sunderland

Brazilian Felipe Zanol, who claimed 3rd in SS4 and 4th in the overall after the first 4 stages, continued gaining experience in navigation with CAP, so different from what he is used to in Brazil. Today he finished 12th and sits 7th overall.

Fellow TEAM HRC mate Pizzolito rode consistently, improving stage after stage. The Argentinian rider finished 18th, 13th overall.

A good day for Johnny Campbell who rode with a good pace in the rocky and mountainous tracks of the sixth and last stage, the American rider finished 19th, 18th overall.

Helder Rodrigues, 1st in SS6 – 41st overall:
“I pushed from the start, catching Barreda at Km 40. I passed him and I opened the track until the finish. Last night’s rainfall had damaged the route. There were many dangers so I had to be very careful. The balance of the whole rally is positive. We won the first stage, we were leading the overall classification when I suffered a technical problem and my race was finished in terms of final results, but that’s racing. We musn’t forget that we were here mainly to do the shakedown of the machine. The level of the bike is very good and I look forward to the next Dakar with Honda HRC.”

Helder Rodrigues with Team HRC

Sam Sunderland 4th in SS6 – 10th overall:
“During this rally we had some up and downs with a crash in the 2nd stage, a technical problem, then a 30 minute penalty for missing a way point, but each day we have improved and it has been great to work in this team. This race was a perfect training for us as riders and to do the shakedown of the machine, because it’s almost impossible to reproduce the race conditions in a normal test session.”

Felipe Zanol 12th in SS6 – 7th overall:
“It was a dangerous last stage with many rocks and dangers. I had no reason to push for the final classification so I rode paying attention to the road book. All in all it was a very positive experience. It was my first time in Africa and my priority was to gain experience with the navigation with CAP, which is different from what I’m used to in the races in Brazil. Back home I will continue training.”

Javier Pizzolito 18th in SS6, 13th overall:
“At the start I struggled a bit to maintain my concentration because I didn’t understand why I got 2 hours penalty. We are checking now. Today we had rocky paths and many dangers so I preferred not to take many risks. I leave Morocco feeling very satisfied. The atmosphere in the group is fantastic, we get along very well and this is a big plus for when we face Dakar.”

Johnny Campbell 19th in SS6 – 18th overall:
“With the last night’s rain, the terrain was wet. We had good traction and it was easy to follow the piste. I enjoyed today’s stage through the mountains a lot. The piste was similar to what we have in Nevada and California, where I usually train. The rally was a good test for me. Our team is very experienced in many different areas but we are young as a rally team, so it was very good to be all here to unify the crew and find a good dynamic. The data we collected will be invaluable for the Dakar.”

Henk Hellgers – Team HRC Manager:
“It was the first time that the team had worked together and I’m very happy with the work done by everyone, not only the riders but also the mechanics, engineers and the whole staff. The cooperation among the crew members representing 11 different nationalities is amazing. We wanted to test the whole structure as the Dakar is a tough race. Now we will finalize the last things before shipping all the vehicles to Lima on the 8th and 22nd of November. In total we will have 11 vehicles: 2 trucks, 1 van, 4 Honda ridgeline and 3 motorhomes.”

Katsumi Yamazaki:
“We had a very good start with all five riders and after the problem with Helder’s machine in the 4th stage, we recovered well thanks to the promising performances of the whole team. The base of the machine is good, we have collected invaluable data and we will continue working to improve the bike for the Dakar. Our priority was to have all 5 riders finishing the race and do the shakedown of the machine. We leave Morocco with a positive feeling.”

Morocco Rally – SS6 Unofficial laptimes

Rank Rider (Team)

1

Rodrigues (Honda – TEAM HRC)

2

Pedrero Garcia (KTM)

3

Despres (KTM)

4

Sunderland (Honda – TEAM HRC)

5

Goncalves (Husqvarna)

12

Zanol (Honda – TEAM HRC)

18

Pizzolito (Honda – TEAM HRC)

19

Campbell (Honda – TEAM HRC)

Morocco Rally – Unofficial overall classification

Rank Rider (Team)

1

Despres (KTM)

2

Barreda (Husqvarna)

3

Lopez (KTM)

4

Verhoven (Yamaha)

5

Goncalves (Husqvarna)

7

Zanol (Honda – TEAM HRC)

10

Sunderland (Honda – TEAM HRC)

13

Pizzolito (Honda – TEAM HRC)

18

Campbell (Honda – TEAM HRC)

41

Rodrigues (Honda – TEAM HRC)

 

BOAT REVIEW

Chaparral 226 SSi – Premium Boat with excellent looks, styling and performance (courtesy of BoatTEST.com)

Chaparral 226SSi Cockpit/ Helm area

This 226 SSi is part of a 6-boat series that utilizes Chaparral’s Wide-Tech construction, which means added room, seating and utility. But we found more to like than just roominess. The sunpad has some tricks to offer, premium seats are extraordinarily easy to operate, and the sole storage is back far enough to improve access. All of these little details add up to a boat with a lot more than the sum of its parts.

For the full BoatTEST.com Chaparral 226 SSi review go to:
http://www.boattest.com/boats/boat_video.aspx?ID=2672

Luxury in every corner!

 

BOATING TIP FOR THE MONTH

BOATING SAFETY – Never Forget the Basics
With the peak boating season now upon us, what can we do to ensure a safe boating experience? While accidents do happen, knowledge and experience, together with following a set of boating safety best practices will go a long way in helping to prevent boating accidents.

1. Common Sense is Paramount
Like with so many things in life, never ignore the overriding power of good common sense. When on the water, constantly anticipate your surroundings and the actions of other water-users whether they’re other boats, waterskiers, kayakers or swimmers. Operate your boat responsibly in terms of speed and by keeping a close eye on the activities of all those on board at all times.

2. Being Weather-smart
Before launching your boat, check the weather via online website forecasts, radio or TV. Never take chances with the weather, especially if you’re planning on going out to sea, always making a safe and calculated decision based on the information provided. Once on the water closely monitor the state of the weather in terms of any changes in wind speed and direction, the potential build-up of storm conditions etc. Never put your crew at risk and if there’s any doubt then return to port as quickly as possible.

3. Always wear a life jacket

Wearing your life jacket should become routine

The South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA) requires that you carry an approved personal floatation device, or life jacket, for each person aboard your vessel. A life jacket should be worn at all times while boating because you never know when an accident may occur. Statistics show that nine out of every ten drowning victims may have survived a capsizing or fall overboard if they had been wearing a life jacket, so make sure that you choose a life jacket that’s comfortable and is one that you will wear.

Choose an approved and comfortable PDF

4. Being at one with your boat
Having a clear understanding of your boat is the basis of good seamanship, and is the art of managing your boat as a result of Skipper training and experience gained. It’s about launching, boat handling, overall safety, navigation, boating etiquette, sorting problems and reacting quickly and effectively in the event of an emergency.

Get to know your boat ...very well!

5. Learning to Swim
If you’re going to be spending a lot of time on the water, it’s extremely advantageous if you can swim, especially if an emergency situation should arise, so best get some lessons if you can’t.

6. Skipper Training Courses
What’s of interest is that 85% of boating fatalities worldwide involve operators who had never undertaken any formal boating training. In South Africa, SAMSA requires by law that every boat owner learns the basics of seamanship and takes the appropriate Skipper’s course and gets a Certificate of Competence before taking to the water. What’s more the knowledge that you will gain by taking a Skipper’s course will only hold you in good stead when on the water.

7. Make Sure your Boat is Surveyed Annually
It’s imperative that your boat undergoes an annual Safety Check by a qualified SAMSA representative who needs to check the presence and condition of specific safety equipment based on your boat’s Category rating.

8. Alcohol is a No-No on the Water
The effects of alcohol are even more dangerous on the water than on land because the marine environment accelerates impairment. In boating deaths attributed to alcohol use, more than half capsized or fell overboard. Rather have that sundowner once you’re safely back on land, never risk your own safety and that of your crew when out on the water.

9. Rules of the Road and Boating Etiquette
At all times follow the given rules of the road, and always anticipate that there are people out there who won’t, so always be prepared and be flexible. Above all show respect to all other parties on the water by skippering your boat in a safe and responsible manner.

10. Fit your boat with a VHF Marine Radio
If you’re going to be going out to sea, then a VHF or 29MHz Marine Radio is a compulsory (for any vessel operating more that 1 nautical mile offshore) and essential part of your overall safety equipment.

Equip your boat according to where you'll be using it, better safe than sorry...

11. Fit your Boat with a GPS Navigational System
Also if you’re going out to sea, the fitting of a suitable GPS system to your boat can give you many safety advantages and is most definitely one of the best investments that you’ll ever make. Whatever the weather or visibility conditions it will allow you to steer your boat on a set course (or for even more course accuracy, to follow a series of pre-marked waypoints) allowing you to bring her safely back to port.

12. Use the Kill Switch Lanyard
If you are the operator of a boat, wear a kill switch lanyard at all times while driving. If you fall overboard or lose your balance, the boat will shut off automatically, possibly saving your life or someone else’s. A boat travelling at speed with no helmsman is a scary prospect indeed!

Fasten the Kill-switch to your wrist whenever you're at the helm and under power

13. File a Float Plan
No boater leaves the dock expecting problems, but if trouble comes your way, filing a float plan with a loved one or friend can hasten rescue, and in some cases mean the difference between life and death.

 

 

WWF HONDA MARINE PARKS PROGRAMME

False Bay Ecosystems Risk Assessment

Rubbish adorns many of the beaches in False Bay

An Ecosystems Risk Assessment workshop for False Bay recently took place in Cape Town. The workshop was hosted by WWF-SA, and facilitated by Helene Smit of Feather Associates and Dr Samantha Petersen of WWF-SA.  After an initial multi-stakeholder workshop held in February 2012, a series of focused group workshops was held with each individual stakeholder group, during which representatives were elected to go forward into the second multi-stakeholder ERA workshop phase. There was wide representation of the stakeholder groups in False Bay, allowing for very healthy debate.

Tagging Galjoen

The method used provides a structure to consider divergent issues in a transparent and accountable manner. It involves consideration of the sources of risk, reaching consensus on the consequence and likelihood that they may occur. It also allows for the prioritisation of issues or hazards (with justification) and the subsequent prioritization of management responses. Stakeholders are required to deliberate and develop a shared position. This process results in an agreed-upon roadmap for the way forward.

Snoek being sold on the roadside

ERA workshops provide an excellent way of monitoring and stimulating ecosystems-based management implementation in a transparent and participatory manner through consultation and discussion amongst diverse stakeholders.

False Bay is a new application of this methodology: a multiple-use area, rather than a single use (often including multiple areas – and as such required adaptation. Lessons learnt during the process will be used to further adapt the methodology in order to be robust in such contexts.

All issues of sufficient priority will be used to input into a situational assessment out of which gaps will be identified. Prioritized issues from this ERA include:

  • Compliance and Law enforcement
  • Poaching
  • Education, Awareness and Training
  • Public Safety
  • The need for a coordinated, integrated approach

These will be fed into a process of consultation with the relevant agencies and civil society, the intended outcome of which would be a strategic, integrated management intervention for False Bay to address the problem.

We’ll keep you posted on future developments…

 

PRODUCT NEWS

Honda offering environmentally and people friendly, economical and high quality outboard engines
Honda produces all of its 4-stroke outboard engines at its Hosoe Plant in Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan, and supplies them to North America and Europe, the two main markets, from where all other markets around the world are supplied. Ever since the introduction of the GB30 in 1964 (Honda’s first model), Honda has pioneered the development and production of 4-stroke outboard engines with a low impact on the environment based on the philosophy of Honda’s founder, Soichiro Honda, that “Watercraft should not pollute the waters they ply.”

Honda’s lineup consists of outboard engines ranging from the 2 horsepower BF2 to the all-new flagship 250 horsepower BF250. They all incorporate a wide variety of technologies based on the concepts of being “environmentally and people friendly, economical and high-quality outboard engines.”

Honda BF50

As exhaust gas emission regulations for outboard engines are being strengthened in order to protect the global environment, Honda was one of the first companies to incorporate advanced technology in outboard engines, based on technology it developed for automobiles and motorcycles, to ensure that they were at all times environmentally compliant.

Honda achieved these environmental objectives through the introduction of advanced market-leading technologies such as the PGM-FI (Programmed Fuel Injection) system featuring advanced combustion control, VTEC (Variable Valve Timing and Life Electronic Control), Lean Burn Control (high air-fuel combustion ratio) and Honda’s unique BLAST (Boosted Low Speed Torque) system.

Honda BF250

Without doubt Honda outboard engines have achieved an unparalleled level of customer satisfaction around the world by providing high output and outstanding fuel efficiency. All Honda outboard engine models not only clear but also surpass the most stringent exhaust gas emissions regulations anywhere in the world.

 

 

Honda pioneered 4-Stroke Outboard Engine Technology

Honda GB30

All outboard engines discharge exhaust gas into the water. Since 2-stroke engines burn a mixture of gasoline and oil, this means that oil is discharged into the water. The GB30 was developed at a time when all outboard engines were 2-stroke, and 4-stroke engines were not considered feasible because of the large handicap due to the power weight ratio.
Honda was the first company to clear the Boden Lake regulations in 1993 (first exhaust gas regulations for outboard engines in the world), and received considerable attention as a result. Currently, over 60% of all outboard engines are 4-stroke type. The history of 4-stroke outboard engines is synonymous with the history of Honda outboard engines.

 

 

Honda Marine Outboard Engines Design Concept: “To Be Easy on People and the Environment”

Honda BF150HP

All Honda outboard engines feature a smooth flowing form and silver colour that reflects the surrounding environment to express the integration of people and nature. The techniques used to incorporate a 4-stroke engine in a compact package and design that combines both functionality and beauty have received high acclaim worldwide and is certainly one of the reasons why Honda is the fastest growing outboard engine brand in South Africa.