HONDA PARTNERSHIPS

Leisure Boating Magazine scoops top award!

Gary Randall, Godfrey Castle, Dean Castle and Richard Brown, the Team behind Leisure Boating Magazine

Many congratulations to Godfrey Castle, Publisher and Managing Director of SA’s top selling powerboat magazine, Leisure Boating, who recently received a Lifetime Achievement award from the Marine Retailers Association.

From the Publisher’s desk: What a surprise and what a wonderful, warm, fuzzy feeling!

Leisure Boating is a third-generation rich publication, the roots of which stems from the passion we as a family share for all things boating. We grew up with all types of boats – starting with canoes when out caravanning, to Dabchick yachts when we were too young to be at the controls of an outboard engine, to the powerboats we’re proud to own today – one for inland waters and one for deep sea.

We simply love boating and we love doing what we do – who would have thought that there was an award on offer?

In all reality, I am blessed with having a great team of guys who deserve this award far, far more than I do. The current team of Dean, Gary and Richard are the guys who are passionate about the boating industry and who live the dream of promoting boating as a means of recreation for all South Africans.

Boating adds spice to life. It allows healthy outdoors time where options offer everything from waterskiing and wakeboarding to fishing and memorable and romantic cruises. For us at Leisure Boating magazine, it is a pleasure to promote boating as the means and ends to a great lifestyle, from the smallest boats to the biggest cruisers, and to both men and women. Now in its 13th year of publication, Leisure Boating is proud of its title as South Africa’s top selling powerboat magazine.

I am honoured to be considered worthy of this prestigious award and accept it with pride on behalf of the staff, past and present, at Leisure Boating magazine.

HONDA RACING NEWS

Honda developing Turbo V-6 for Le Mans’ Premier LMP1 Category

Honda Performance Development HR22T LMP1 engine

Honda, more specifically Honda’s U.S.-based Honda Performance Development unit, is working on a new engine it hopes to sell to private teams competing in the World Endurance Championship and the series’ highlight, the 24 Hours of Le Mans. The new engine is a turbocharged V-6 that will be offered to teams competing in the series’ premier LMP1 category next season.

By 2015, HPD also hopes to have a range of bespoke energy recovery options ready. These are being developed in accordance with the series’ new energy-based powertrian regulations.

Starting in 2014, rather than any set engine displacement or air inlet restrictor limits, the technical regulations specify a maximum fuel-flow rate into the engine, with or without energy recovery systems. Teams can run without energy recovery systems or choose to add the level of energy recovery that best suits their needs, i.e. everything from no energy recovery up to a maximum eight Megajoules.

HPD is already a supplier to teams competing in the lesser LMP2 category, offering up a V-8 engine to teams in the WEC and American Le Mans Series. Cars using the new LMP1 engine, however, will be competing against the latest prototypes from Audi, Porsche and Toyota. Toppling these giants will be no small feat but HPD certainly has plenty of experience. The company will also have access to technology being developed for Honda’s new Formula One engine, which will also be a turbocharged V-6.

HPD’s new engine, to be designated the Honda HR22T, is based on the same architecture used in IndyCar since 2012. The particular unit is a direct-injected and turbocharged 2.2-litre V-6, which has been designed to work with a new energy recovery system developed in concert with HPD technical partner Magneti Marelli.

Despite its new focus on the WEC’s LMP1 category, HPD still plans to supply engines and chassis to teams competing in the LMP2 category as well as those teams competing in the newly combined United Sports Car Racing series. In fact, HPD and chassis technical partner Wirth Research are also developing an enclosed version of its successful ARX chassis, powered by its new HR22T engine and energy recovery technology, which will provide teams with a fully integrated solution from next year.

With these latest developments in endurance racing, as well as the return to F1, there remains little doubt that Honda is once again committed to motorsport. Hopefully we’ll see some actual benefits transferred to Honda’s road car programme. The 2015 Acura NSX is a good start but a few accessible sports cars would be even better.

 

 

IndyCar Series 2013 – Round 14: Mid Ohio – August 4, 2013

Kimball Continues Honda Winning Streak at Mid-Ohio

Charlie Kimball (Chip Ganassi Racing)

Taking advantage of a multi-car team’s ability to run different race strategies, Chip Ganassi Racing’s Charlie Kimball played the role of “hare” to perfection at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course, leading a race-high 46 laps between three pit stops to score his first IZOD IndyCar Series race victory in the Honda Indy 200.

Many other front-running efforts, including those of teammates Scott Dixon and Dario Franchitti, Team Penske’s Will Power and pole qualifier Ryan Hunter-Reay, went into fuel-conservation mode early in the race, attempting to run the 90-lap distance on just two pit stops. But Kimball and eventual second-place finisher Simon Pagenaud elected to run flat-out from the green flag to the chequered, and that proved to be the winning strategy for Honda’s seventh race win of 2013, tying it with Chevrolet in the season-long battle for the Manufacturers’ Championship.

Kimball’s win was the fourth in a row for Honda this season, and the fifth consecutive victory at Mid-Ohio for both Honda and the Chip Ganassi Racing organization. Honda has been undefeated at its mid-western “home” circuit since Indy car racing returned to Mid-Ohio in 2007 after a four-year absence. Kimball also made history as the first driver with diabetes to win an Indy car race. The 28-year-old Californian was diagnosed with Type-1 diabetes six years ago while racing in Europe.

Kimball’s strongest competition came from Detroit race winner Pagenaud, who ran an identical strategy and led 14 laps in another exceptional effort from the Schmidt Hamilton HP Racing team. The move of the race came on Lap 73, as Pagenaud exited the pits after his final stop with a narrow advantage over his rival. But Kimball used his “push-to-pass” button to regain the lead, executing the decisive pass of Pagenaud as the pair entered Turn 5, at the end of the long Mid-Ohio back straight. Once in front, Kimball gradually extended his advantage to just over five seconds at the chequered.

Simon Pagenaud (Schmidt Hamilton Motorsports)

Behind the lead pair, four-time series champion Franchitti was the first to recognize the need for a strategy change, and shifting to a three-stop programme at mid-race enabled the 2010 Mid-Ohio race winner to finish third and complete a sweep of the victory podium for Honda. Teammate Dixon also changed strategy a few laps later to keep his driver’s championship hopes high with a seventh-place finish, just in front of Justin Wilson, who had another strong race for Dale Coyne Racing with an eighth-place result.

IndyCar Series

Round 14: Mid Ohio

From left Simon Pagenaud (Schmidt Hamilton Motorsports), Charlie Kimball (Chip Ganassi Racing), Dario Franchitti (Chip Ganassi Racing)

Rank Driver (Team)

1

Charlie Kimball (Chip Ganassi Racing)

2

Simon Pagenaud (Schmidt Hamilton Motorsports)

3

Dario Franchitti (Chip Ganassi Racing)

4

Will Power (Team Penske)

5

Ryan Hunter-Reay (Andretti Autosport)

6

Helio Castroneves (Team Penske)

7

Scott Dixon (Chip Ganassi Racing)

8

Justin Wilson (Dale Coyne Racing)

9

Marco Andretti (Andretti Autosport)

10

James Hinchcliffe (Andretti Autosport)

13

James Jakes (Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing)

15

James Davison (Dale Coyne Racing)

16

Luca Filippi (Barracuda Racing/Bryan Herta)

18

Graham Rahal (Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing)

21

Tristan Vautier (Schmidt Peterson Motorsports)

22

Takuma Sato (A.J. Foyt Racing)

23

Josef Newgarden (Sarah Fisher Hartman Racing)

 

 

MotoGP World Championship Grand Prix 2013 – Round 10: Indianapolis – August 18, 2013

Honda takes maximum points as racing resumes at Indy

Marc Marquez

Repsol Honda RC213V riders Marc Marquez and Dani Pedrosa finished first and second at the Indianapolis Grand Prix at the iconic “Brickyard”, resuming the interrupted racing season in the best possible form as both increase their world championship points lead over closest rival Jorge Lorenzo (Yamaha) who came third.

It was a third win in succession for 20-year-old class rookie Marc Marquez, who had won the last two Moto2 races here in 2011 and 2012, en route to the 2012 Championship. It gave him a three-out-of-three hat-trick in the USA. He won round two in Austin, Texas in April, then the US GP at Laguna Seca before the summer break.

He now leads the Word Championship by 21 points, the youngest rider ever to do so – just one of many records the Spanish rider has smashed in his maiden MotoGP season. With two more races in the next two weekends, the contest is reaching a crescendo. Marquez now has 188 points to Pedrosa’s 167, with Lorenzo losing ground on 153.

Marquez was in top form from the start, dominating free practice and qualifying on pole for the fourth time this year. But it was Lorenzo who led away in perfect conditions, closely pursued by Pedrosa and the rookie.

Marquez took second after eight of the 28 laps, and moved into the lead before half distance. The three stayed close, then Marquez stretched his lead to win by 3.495 seconds.

Pedrosa’s second place was hardly any less of an achievement. The 27-year-old Spaniard, who ceded the points lead to his team-mate three races ago when forced out of the German GP with a broken collarbone, is still recovering from the injury and racing in damage-control mode.

Dani Pedrosa

He had dropped to third behind Lorenzo, also injured at the same race, but a superhuman effort in the closing stages saw him close a gap of a second and then get back ahead with three laps remaining. Pedrosa finished the race in obvious pain, and is looking forward to continued physical improvement to help him regain further momentum, after winning two races earlier in the season to take the points lead.

Fans at the 4.216 km (2.62-mile) infield circuit, which shares part of the front straight and the famous “yard of bricks” with the historic and world-famous Indianapolis Oval, enjoyed warm and dry weather, with exciting racing for the remaining championship points. The warmer conditions made tyre choice important, with all factory riders opting for the same hard front/ soft rear combination.

Sixth-placed Team GO&FUN Honda Gresini RC213V rider Alvaro Bautista played a leading role in what was eventually a three-bike battle for fourth. He had been to and fro with Cal Crutchlow (Yamaha), when the similarly mounted multi-champion Valentino Rossi caught up in the last laps. Former 125cc World Champion Bautista came off worst in a fairing-bashing brawl in the final corner. Rossi led the trio across the line almost side by side, all within two tenths of a second. Bautista uniquely uses Showa suspension and Nissin brakes, race-developing the Japanese equipment made by Honda associates.

Alvaro Bautista

German LCR Honda RC213V rider Stefan Bradl was ninth, after tailing Bautista until the closing stages, then losing pace after Rossi caught and passed him. Bradl was fresh off a career-best pole and second place at the last round at Laguna Seca, and was second fastest in free practice – but a tumble in qualifying dropped him to eighth on the grid, spoiling his confidence and his chances of a repeat performance.

Stefan Bradl

Australian grand prix first-timer Bryan Staring (Team GO&FUN Honda Gresini FTR Honda) was 19th on the Honda CBR1000RR-powered CRT machine, on his first visit to the circuit.

Moto2
An exciting race in the all-Honda-powered Moto2 class saw Tito Rabat (Tuenti HP Pons Kalex) take his second win of the year, after breaking free from the group disputing second to hunt down and pass long-time leader Takaaki Nakagami (Italtrans Racing Team Kalex), for whom second was still a career best.

Crucially for the championship, points leader Scott Redding (Marc VDS Racing Team Kalex) secured third place over his nearest rival Pol Espargaro (Tuenti HP 40 Pons Kalex), who had been closing up on the Englishman over the past three races. Redding passed Espargaro with a fierce move with three of 25 laps remaining; leaving the Spaniard with his hands full fending off Switzerland’s Dominique Aegerter (Technomag carXpert Suter).

Simone Corsi (NGM Mobile Racing Speed Up) won a four-rider battle for sixth, from Mika Kallio (Marc VDS Racing Team Kalex), Johann Zarco (Came Iodaracing Project Suter) and Xavier Simeon (Maptaq SAG Zelos Team Kalex).

Redding regained a championship cushion of more than one race win, on 159 points to Espargaro’s 133. Rabat’s 25-point win moved him closer in third, on 113.

Moto2 machines use identical race-tuned Honda CBR600 engines supplied by the organizers to guarantee close and reliable racing. Variety comes in the different prototype chassis used.

Moto3
In the Moto3 class, where Honda faces rival manufacturers KTM and Mahindra, Australian Jack Miller (Caretta Technology-RTG FTR Honda) has been the most successful Honda rider. The same was expected at Indianapolis, where he again qualified on the second row of the grid. Miller made a flying start and was with the leading group when he crashed out after four of the 23 laps, suffering a suspected broken collarbone.

With his nearest championship rival Brad Binder (Ambrogio Racing Suter Honda) retiring from the race, this left the Honda action to Romano Fenati (San Carlo Team Italia FTR Honda), Ongetta-Rivacold FTR Honda rider Alexis Masbou, Alan Techer (CIP Moto3 TSR Honda), Niccolo Antonelli (GO&FUN Gresini Moto3 FTR Honda) and Isaac Vinales (Ongetta-Centro Seta FTR Honda), all locked together mid-race in a fierce seven-rider fight.

Vinales crashed out and Antonelli dropped back out of the points, but Fenati was a close ninth at the finish, Masbou and Techer still battling in 12th and 13th.

MotoGP World Championship Grand Prix
Round 10: Indianapolis

MotoGP

Marc Marquez

Rank Rider (Team)

1

Marc MARQUEZ (Repsol Honda Team)

2

Dani PEDROSA (Repsol Honda Team)

3

Jorge LORENZO (Yamaha Factory Racing)

4

Valentino ROSSI (Yamaha Factory Racing)

5

Cal CRUTCHLOW (Monster Yamaha Tech 3)

6

Alvaro BAUTISTA (GO&FUN Honda Gresini)

7

Stefan BRADL (LCR Honda MotoGP)

8

Bradley SMITH (Monster Yamaha Tech 3)

9

Nicky HAYDEN (Ducati Team)

10

Andrea DOVIZIOSO (Ducati Team)

11

Andrea IANNONE (Energy T.I. Pramac Racing)

12

Aleix ESPARGARO (Power Electronics Aspar)

13

Colin EDWARDS (NGM Mobile Forward Racing)

14

Claudio CORTI (NGM Mobile Forward Racing)

15

Hiroshi AOYAMA (Avintia Blusens)

Moto2

Rank Rider (Team)

1

Esteve RABAT (Tuenti HP 40)

2

Takaaki NAKAGAMI (Italtrans Racing Team)

3

Scott REDDING (Marc VDS Racing Team)

4

Pol ESPARGARO (Tuenti HP 40)

5

Dominique AEGERTER (Technomag carXpert)

6

Simone CORSI (NGM Mobile Racing)

7

Mika KALLIO (Marc VDS Racing Team)

8

Johann ZARCO (Came Iodaracing Project)

9

Xavier SIMEON (Desguaces La Torre Maptaq)

10

Jordi TORRES (Mapfre Aspar Team Moto2)

11

Julian SIMON (Italtrans Racing Team)

12

Nicolas TEROL (Mapfre Aspar Team Moto2)

13

Thomas LUTHI (Interwetten Paddock Moto2 Racing)

14

Alex DE ANGELIS (Ignite Pramac Racing)

15

Marcel SCHROTTER (Desguaces La Torre SAG)

Moto3

Rank Rider (Team)

1

Alex RINS (Estrella Galicia 0,0)

2

Alex MARQUEZ (Estrella Galicia 0,0)

3

Maverick VIÑALES (Team Calvo)

4

Jonas FOLGER (Mapfre Aspar Team Moto3)

5

Luis SALOM (Red Bull KTM Ajo)

6

Arthur SISSIS (Red Bull KTM Ajo)

7

Zulfahmi KHAIRUDDIN (Red Bull KTM Ajo)

8

Miguel OLIVEIRA (Mahindra Racing)

9

Romano FENATI (San Carlo Team Italia)

10

Jakub KORNFEIL (Redox RW Racing GP)

11

Niklas AJO (Avant Tecno)

12

Alexis MASBOU (Ongetta-Rivacold)

13

Alan TECHER (CIP Moto3)

14

Livio LOI (Marc VDS Racing Team)

15

Matteo FERRARI (Ongetta-Centro Seta)

 

BOAT REVIEWS

Chaparral 277 SSX: Classy and Innovative Bowrider (courtesy of BoatTest.com)

Chaparral 277 SSX

Fans of big bowriders will love the Chaparral 277 SSX with her LOA of 27’6” (8.38 m) and 9’ (2.74 m) beam. No one ever said that the design team at Chaparral wasn’t innovative, but if there were any doubts, then the 277 SSX would squash them like a bug. She’s got clever features throughout, but that’s not our main focus. We’re more concerned with how she handles, manoeuvres, and docks. She’s available with no less than 11 engine and drive combinations, and today we put her through her paces with the 380-hp MerCruiser 8.2 MAG turning a B3 outdrive.

Chaparral 277 SSX

To read the review click on the link: http://bit.ly/Z20DHa

 

Chaparral 284 Sunesta: All Deckboats are Not the Same (courtesy of BoatTest.com)

Chaparral 284 Sunesta

We think this is one of the most instructional videos that Capt. Steve has done recently. He not only describes the boat, but gives us an in-depth view of her bottom, tips on how to manoeuvre the 264 underway (her wheel takes just 2.5 turns from lock-to-lock), as well as finishing with a short tutorial on how to dock a single engine sterndrive with counter-rotating props. WOT speed was 49.1 mph – something not many deck boats will do with the tested power.

Chaparral 284 Sunesta

To read the review click on the link: http://bit.ly/YHhI7b

BOATING TIP FOR THE MONTH

Always make sure you’re prepared for Heavy Weather

When it comes to Heavy Weather follow a predetermined action plan

People often get caught in heavy weather when they are least expecting it, so it’s critical to know what to do when it does happen. Before venturing out to sea, even if armed with the appropriate skipper’s licence and the necessary approved safety equipment, make sure that you’re fully aware of both your boat’s and your own capabilities, and that you’ll be able to manage a heavy weather situation when it does hit.

Click on the link to view some heavy weather boat handling:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ihzaDoG1JfY

Before going out to sea, constantly monitor the current and future short term weather forecasts and obviously if you have any doubts, then your best decision would be to stay at home. Weather can change quickly and developing your heavy weather skills is something that you should build up over time, practicing in choppy sheltered waters or perhaps crewing out at sea with more experienced skippers, it’s not something that you should try and master once you’ve been caught unawares.

Constantly keep a close eye on the weather

Should you however be exposed to heavy weather, following the guidelines below should allow you to successfully get through it:

  • Get all crew to put on their Personal Flotation Devices (PFD’S) if they’re not already wearing them. Apart from the obvious flotation benefits of anyone finding themselves in the water, it also offers all crew some protective padding if the boat is being tossed around.
  • Brief all crew/passengers to keep low in the boat, this lowers the centre of gravity of the boat helping with the overall stability and also reduces the possibility of passengers falling or being thrown overboard.

    Ensure everyone is wearing a life jacket (PFD) and has one hand on the boat at all times...

  • Secure all loose gear, fittings and any openings such as hatches and storage doors.
  • Assess your current position – where exactly are you and just how much danger are you and your crew in at that precise moment.
  • Put out a Pan-Pan call on your VHF radio – Channel 16. This will alert local authorities that you have an urgent situation, but that there is no immediate danger to anyone’s life on the boat. If there is immediate danger then a Mayday call would be more appropriate.
  • Check the possibilities open to you – can you get safely to shore/ nearer land/ back to the marine/ protected water nearby? If any of these potential courses are not at a 45º angle into the swell, it might be best to stay where you are and ‘jog in place’.
  • Move at the minimum possible speed forward – this reduces the risk of capsizing and allows you to assess and consider your options.

MAIN POINTS:

Rather invest in a smaller boat than this one, then when you see this in front of you, you turn around immediately and give those Hondas a run...!

  1. Understand your own limits as well as your vessel’s. Build up your skills to deal with heavy weather firstly in protected waters before trying it out at sea.
  2. Learn about weather and how to make your own onboard forecasts based on building up knowledge and correctly interpreting the reports.
  3. At all times stay calm/ take control.

 

 

 

WWF HONDA MARINE PARKS PROGRAMME

A broader perspective on Marine Conservation
by John Duncan and Junaid Francis

African penguins at artificial nest boxes

One of the challenges faced by conservation practitioners around the world are the challenges from some groups of stakeholders that they feel that they are the only ones who are expected to change while other stakeholders are often allowed to continue with business-as-usual. When working with communities and small-scale fishers around Marine Protected Areas (MPAs), who are often the stakeholder groups that are most impacted by these conservation tools, it is therefore important to highlight some of the work that is being done with other marine resource users to help secure the future of marine ecosystems.

Understanding that they are part of a much bigger group of people, all of whom are reliant on healthy ecosystems, and that they are not alone in tackling what can sometimes seem like an insurmountable challenge.

It is for this reason that it is important to highlight WWF’s ongoing work with some of South Africa’s larger commercial fisheries, who are another key stakeholder in discussions around marine conservation. Since 2009, the Responsible Fisheries Alliance (RFA), a partnership between WWF South Africa, BirdLife South Africa and four major fishing companies, has been working towards the shared goal of implementing an Ecosystems Approach to Fisheries (EAF) management in South African fisheries. Although the relationship between environmental NGOs and fishing companies has not always been an easy one, through the creation of the RFA, stakeholders are now able to tackle some of the big challenges collaboratively and the last few years have seen some significantly positive shifts.

Since its inception, the RFA has been involved in a number of projects aimed at tackling the challenges of fishing responsibly, ranging from mitigating seabird bycatch to improving fishers’ understanding of the EAF through Responsible Fisheries training programmes. The RFA has recently committed a number of new projects, which will enable the Alliance to contribute toward addressing some key local fisheries concerns, such as the state of vulnerable fish species and declining African penguin population numbers, by encouraging cooperative governance and advocating for evidence-based decision making. By embarking on a project with an emphasis on safeguarding key bycatch species in the inshore trawl fishery, RFA efforts will also contribute towards the development of a co-management system which is envisaged to provide a mechanism whereby bycatch can be regulated without providing individual rights holders with an incentive to discard catch. The management plan will commit industry to develop and regulate fishing quotas which are set in concert with government-determined catch limits with the aim of limiting the impacts of the fishery on vulnerable fish species while preserving its economic viability.

Hake trawler with tori lines

The impact of fishing on African penguins remains a salient issue for the Alliance and, as such, a project has been initiated that strives to examine the impact of the small pelagic fishery on the African penguin populations of Bird Island and St Croix Island. This unique experiment will increase immensely our understanding of penguin behaviour in relation to variability in their prey availability and how these are influenced by fishing pressure. The findings of this study will be used to improve the efficacy of fishing closures in view of both the economic sensitivities of the fishery and the biologic needs of the African penguin.

Additionally, the Alliance is also committed to advocating for responsible fishing practices through a project seeking to adapt the principles underpinning the FAO’s Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries and developing a localised version for South African fisheries. This generic code will then be used to lobby each South African fishery to develop and implement a fishery-specific Code of Conduct. The project is aimed at furnishing local fisheries with a set of principles and standards of behaviour to encourage responsible fishing practices and the implementation of an EAF.

Lastly, an exciting study has been commissioned by the RFA to streamline the local fisheries data management model by enriching the local model with lessons learnt from an analysis of international best practice models. Current methods to collect, capture and process fisheries data are inefficient, often leaving decision makers without adequate access to timeous fisheries data. This project will seek to provide managers with access to ‘real time’ data thereby ensuring that decision-making is based on defensible scientific evidence.

St Helena sardine trawler

When coupled with WWF’s work through the Southern African Sustainable Seafood Initiative (SASSI), it becomes clear that an increasingly broad group of stakeholders are starting to engage with WWF on the challenges facing our oceans. While the challenges may be different, the goal remains the same, healthy marine ecosystems which provide long-term benefits to all.

For more information about the RFA’s work, please see the RFA’s website: http://www.rfalliance.org.za/

For more information about SASSI’s work, please see the SASSI’s website: www.wwf.org.za/sassi